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Anti-Oppression LibGuide: Anti-oppression resources

This guide attempts to provide general information and a starting point to learn about anti-oppression, inclusion, and privilege, as well as provide knowledge and resources to key social justice issues. The NYIT community is welcome to suggest resources.

 

“Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral. ” 
 Paulo Freire

 

Terms

Oppression: Institutionalized power that is historically formed and perpetuated over time and allows "certain groups" of people to assume a dominant position over other groups and this dominance is maintained and continued at an institutional level. this means that oppression is built into institutions like government and educational systems. 

  • On a personal level, oppression expresses itself through beliefs (stereotypes), attitudes, values (prejudice), and actions (discrimination) used to justify unfair treatment based on distinct aspects of one’s identity, real or perceived. These can be internalized and directed towards the self or externalized and directed towards those we interact with on a day-to-day basis.

Classism: A hierarchical system that provides or denies resources, agency, and dignity based on one’s, or one’s perceived, socioeconomic class (poor/working class, middle/upper class, upper class, etc.). 

Prejudice:  Prejudice is an unjustified or incorrect attitude (usually negative) towards an individual based solely on the individual’s membership of a social group. source: McLeod, S. A. (2008). Prejudice and Discrimination.

Microaggression: Everyday verbal and non-verbal slides, indignities, put downs and insults, whether intentional or not that people of color, women, LGTBQIA and other marginalized groups experience in their everyday interactions with others. These interactions, often times appear to be a compliment but contain a hidden insult to the person receiving the comment. Microaggressions occur because they are outside of the level of conscious awareness of the perpetrator and are rooted in ideologies, such as racism, classism, sexism, colonialism, and other discriminatory beliefs systems. ( Source: Microaggressions in everyday life video) 

We can reduce our engagement in microaggression by:

Ableism: A system of superiority and discrimination that provides or denies resources, agency, and dignity based on one’s abilities (mental/intellectual, emotional, and/or physical.) Ableism depends on a binary, and benefits able-bodied people at the expense of disabled people. Like other forms of oppression, ableism operates on the individual, institutional and cultural levels.

Privilege: Unearned, special advantage that a person is born into or acquires during their lifetime. It's supported by informal and formal institutions of society and conferred to all members of a dominant group. Privilege implies that whenever there is a system of oppression( such as capitalism, patriarchy, or white supremacy)  there is an oppressed and privileged group who benefits from oppressions that the system puts in place.  

Essential readings on privilege:

Diversity: The range of human differences, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, social class, physical ability or attributes, religious and ethical value system, national origin, and political beliefs. Source: Ferris State University-Diversity and inclusion center.

Inclusion: Involvement and empowerment, where the inherent worth and dignity of people are recognized. Source: Ferris State University-Diversity and inclusion center. 

Otherwise stated, terms adapted from: 

Class and Classicism

Organizations:

  • Center for Study and working-class life: "The Center for Study of Working Class Life is dedicated to exploring the meaning of class in today’s world. Looking at society through the lens of class clarifies many important social questions in new ways – why the rich get richer while the poor get poorer, what attacks on government programs through privatization mean, why the suburbs aren’t really a middle-class haven, how the "family values" debate impacts our lives, and much more. We are an interdisciplinary effort of faculty and staff at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, founded in November 1999." 
  • Resource Generation: "Resource Generation envisions a world in which all communities are powerful, healthy, and living in alignment with the planet.  A world that is racially and economically just in which wealth, land, and power are shared."
  •   Class Action:  "Class Action inspires action to end classism and extreme inequality by providing change-makers with tools, training, and inspiration to raise awareness and shift cultural beliefs about social class, build cross-class solidarity, and transform institutions and systems."

Books and other media

Films:

  • Class Divide: A look at NYC’s gentrification and growing inequality in a microcosm, Class Divide explores two distinct worlds.On one side of the avenue, the Chelsea-Elliot Houses have provided low-income public housing to residents for decades. Their neighbor across the avenue since 2012 is Avenues: The World School, a costly private school. What happens when kids from both of these worlds attempt to cross the divide?​
  • 13th: Documentary explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation's prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans. Faculty: Netflix makes available a Grant of Permission for Educational Purposes.
  • I am not your Negro: In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, "Remember This House." The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin's death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of this manuscript. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished.

Syllabus:

  • Blackislam Syllabi This project is curated by Dr. Kayla Renée Wheeler and was inspired by Prof. Najeeba Syeed-Miller, #BlackInMSA, and Muslim ARC.  The goal of this project is to provide teachers, professors, researchers, journalists, and people interested in learning more about Islam with resources on Black Muslims to promote a more inclusive approach to the study of Islam.
  • Charleston syllabi: Conceived by Chad Williams (@Dr_ChadWilliams), Associate Professor of African and Afro-American Studies at Brandeis University. With the help of Kidada Williams (@KidadaEWilliams), the hashtag started trending on Twitter on the evening of June 19, 2015.
  • Fergurson syllabi:  crowdsource after the events in Fergurson, Missouri. 
  • Immigration Syllabi: The Immigration Syllabus online site is produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing and eLearning Support Initiative.
  • Standingrock syllabi:  This syllabus project contributes to the already substantial work of the Sacred Stone Camp, Red Warrior camp, and the Oceati Sakowin Camp to resist the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which threatens traditional and treaty-guaranteed Great Sioux Nation territory. 

Organizations: 

  • Southern poverty law center: The Southern Poverty Law Center is an American nonprofit legal advocacy organization specializing in civil rights and public interest litigation.
  • Colorlines:  Daily news site where race matters, featuring award-winning investigative reporting and news analysis. Published by Race Forward, a national organization that advances racial justice through research, media, and practice. 

Related guides: 

  

FYI

This guide attempts to provide general information and a starting point to learn about anti-oppression, inclusion, and privilege, as well as provide knowledge and resources to key social justice issues. The NYIT community is welcome to suggest resources, guides, or any other information relevant to this guide by emailing lmoronta@nyit.edu. Also contact me if you notice any dead links.

 

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